#PopCultureClass: Beyonce's September 2018 Vogue Shoot Led to Artistic Inspiration - and Perhaps Copyright Infringement

One of the most popular magazine covers this year is the Vogue September 2018 edition featuring Beyoncé' on the cover. This edition is also history-making because a black photographer, Tyler Mitchell, shot the cover for the first time in Vogue's 126 year history. The inspiring shoot has led to some instances of copying, but is this kind of copying illegal? I think so, and I explain why here.

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Digital Legacy Planning Tips for Parents, Courtesy of Beyoncé and JAY-Z

Unless you've been living under a rock or in one of the thirteen countries without internet access, you probably know that the Knowles/Carter family has been making headlines for all kinds of reasons lately. 2017 has been good to them, especially when it comes to building a legacy for their kids. What can parents learn from the Carters about protecting the digital assets of their children? As it turns out, a lot.  

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Other Ways to Get Out of the Hood - Since Your Kid Probably Isn't Going to the Pros

I've had a few discussions about the significant, and seemingly growing, emphasis that many people place on professional sports in the lives of kids - especially in the African-American community. These discussions made me curious about the actual statistics on how many people actually make it to the pros. The results were even more stark than I thought. 

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Can the world ever really keep terrorists off the internet?

Because the internet is geographically borderless, nearly any message can have a global audience. Questions about online regulation have persisted for years, especially regarding harmful information. Finding widespread common ground on internet-based issues will likely only become more difficult as the U.K. exits from the EU and the U.S. takes increasingly nationalist positions. Even so, the experiences of smaller groups of countries may inform a broader effort as global policies on terrorism shift, and the world’s approach to internet regulation changes with it.

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Theresa May Can’t Just Blame the Internet for Terrorism

In the wake of recent terrorist attacks in the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Theresa May publicly criticized “the Internet” and the “big companies that provide Internet-based services” as providing a safe space for terrorist ideologies to spread. May did not, however, specifically identify the spaces or companies she views as problematic. While these kinds of all-encompassing, non-specific statements may be politically effective in the lead-up to this week's general election in the UK, any serious attempts to address the spread of terrorism deserves significantly more nuance. Anything less is harmful to global discourse on such matters.

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