Posts in In the News
What to do when someone is vindictive, racist, and out to get you - Lessons from Ona Judge

Ona Judge’s life and story is remarkable, and there’s a lot we can learn from her even today. Ona was targeted and hunted by America’s first president—who was vindictive, racist, and out to get her—because she wanted the fundamental, basic human right of freedom. This article shares her story in honor of Black History Month.

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A Tale of Two Chicagos: What I Learned From Becoming and Surviving R. Kelly

America’s major cities each have their own vibe. Chicago’s vibe has been on my mind a lot lately, in part because of Michelle Obama’s Becoming and Lifetime’s Surviving R. Kelly. I have thoughts on the intersections between the two, and what Chicago is trying to teach us. I’m sharing a couple of these observations here.

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#PopCultureClass: Beyonce's September 2018 Vogue Shoot Led to Artistic Inspiration - and Perhaps Copyright Infringement

One of the most popular magazine covers this year is the Vogue September 2018 edition featuring Beyoncé' on the cover. This edition is also history-making because a black photographer, Tyler Mitchell, shot the cover for the first time in Vogue's 126 year history. The inspiring shoot has led to some instances of copying, but is this kind of copying illegal? I think so, and I explain why here.

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Digital Legacy Planning Tips for Parents, Courtesy of Beyoncé and JAY-Z

Unless you've been living under a rock or in one of the thirteen countries without internet access, you probably know that the Knowles/Carter family has been making headlines for all kinds of reasons lately. 2017 has been good to them, especially when it comes to building a legacy for their kids. What can parents learn from the Carters about protecting the digital assets of their children? As it turns out, a lot.  

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Can the world ever really keep terrorists off the internet?

Because the internet is geographically borderless, nearly any message can have a global audience. Questions about online regulation have persisted for years, especially regarding harmful information. Finding widespread common ground on internet-based issues will likely only become more difficult as the U.K. exits from the EU and the U.S. takes increasingly nationalist positions. Even so, the experiences of smaller groups of countries may inform a broader effort as global policies on terrorism shift, and the world’s approach to internet regulation changes with it.

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Theresa May Can’t Just Blame the Internet for Terrorism

In the wake of recent terrorist attacks in the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Theresa May publicly criticized “the Internet” and the “big companies that provide Internet-based services” as providing a safe space for terrorist ideologies to spread. May did not, however, specifically identify the spaces or companies she views as problematic. While these kinds of all-encompassing, non-specific statements may be politically effective in the lead-up to this week's general election in the UK, any serious attempts to address the spread of terrorism deserves significantly more nuance. Anything less is harmful to global discourse on such matters.

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Hiring 3,000 More Workers Won’t Fix Facebook’s Violent Video Crisis

Last week, Facebook stated that it is hiring 3,000 new people to monitor and remove inappropriate posts like graphic and violent videos. This makes sense, given that the company has seen an influx of violent videos featuring murders, suicides, and rapes posted on the site. Hiring 3,000 new employees isn’t a bad start, but these future hires will not eliminate Facebook’s video problems. And it isn’t clear yet if anything will.

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It’s Time the FCC Step in Before There’s Another Facebook Murder Video

 

This week’s tragedy involving Robert Godwin has renewed the debate over the level of responsibility social media companies like Facebook have in monitoring and permanently removing graphic content. As I argue in the below Fortune Magazine article, it's time for someone to step in before there's another Facebook murder video. All of this, of course, would raise serious and legitimate censorship and free speech concerns. If social media users don't want to see rapes, murders, and suicides as they scroll through their feeds, however, something must change.

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