Posts in Social Justice
What to do when someone is vindictive, racist, and out to get you - Lessons from Ona Judge

Ona Judge’s life and story is remarkable, and there’s a lot we can learn from her even today. Ona was targeted and hunted by America’s first president—who was vindictive, racist, and out to get her—because she wanted the fundamental, basic human right of freedom. This article shares her story in honor of Black History Month.

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America’s always had black inventors – even when the patent system explicitly excluded them

America has long been the land of innovation. More than 13,000 years ago, the Clovis people created what many call the “first American invention.” This spirit of American creativity has persisted through the millennia, through the first American patent granted in 1641 and on to today. One group of prolific innovators, however, has been largely ignored by history: black inventors born or forced into American slavery. This article highlights several of these inventors and other current black inventors following in their footsteps.

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A Tale of Two Chicagos: What I Learned From Becoming and Surviving R. Kelly

America’s major cities each have their own vibe. Chicago’s vibe has been on my mind a lot lately, in part because of Michelle Obama’s Becoming and Lifetime’s Surviving R. Kelly. I have thoughts on the intersections between the two, and what Chicago is trying to teach us. I’m sharing a couple of these observations here.

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Send an Email to Betty Jean Owens, a Living Civil Rights and Women’s Rights Heroine

As we go into Black History Month this year, I’ll be sharing little-known moments in history that reflect the multifaceted ways in which black people have contributed to the country’s tapestry. This post features the story of Betty Jean Owens, a civil rights and women’s rights heroine who helped make it possible for people of color and women to speak up in the face of injustice today.

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It’s Time the FCC Step in Before There’s Another Facebook Murder Video

 

This week’s tragedy involving Robert Godwin has renewed the debate over the level of responsibility social media companies like Facebook have in monitoring and permanently removing graphic content. As I argue in the below Fortune Magazine article, it's time for someone to step in before there's another Facebook murder video. All of this, of course, would raise serious and legitimate censorship and free speech concerns. If social media users don't want to see rapes, murders, and suicides as they scroll through their feeds, however, something must change.

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Gerrymandering - why getting out the vote isn't enough

Yes - it is important to vote and get engaged in the political process. People on both sides of the aisle are readying themselves for the 2018 midterm elections and looking forward to 2020 also. People are resisting, making America great again, getting out the vote, rocking the vote, and everything in between. But, one point I'd like to raise is that much of those efforts pale in comparison to dealing with the issue of gerrymandering.

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"Bitch, It's Saturday" as a Trademark

Just a few weeks ago, the Women's March descended on nearly 700 locations around the globe with almost 5 million participants. It is estimated to be the biggest protest demonstration in American history. Many marveled that, though conditions were tight, cold, and uncomfortable, people were mostly nice and polite to each other. The response of a protester to one not-so- nice person has led to an interesting trademark application. 

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